History

History at Key Stage Three

All pupils at Key Stage Three are timetabled for two, one hour lessons, per week.

Year Seven:

Pupils study two main topics; 'Medieval Realms 1066-1485,' which examines aspects of life in England from the Norman Conquest to the Battle of Bosworth.

In addition, a separate unit is studied on 'Islamic Kingdoms 750-1450,' which allows parallels to be drawn between life in the Islamic Kingdoms of the Middle East and North Africa and the aforementioned work on Medieval England.

 

Year Eight:

An additional two topics are studied; 'Britain 1500-1750,' in which pupils predominantly look at life in Tudor and Stuart England, as well as the 'Making of the United Kingdom.'

To provide a transition to the work covered in Year Nine, pupils also explore 'Revoluntionary France 1789-1815,' in which they examine the origins, events and outcomes of the French Revolution.

 

Year Nine:

A final two topics are studied; 'Britain 1750-1900,' in which pupils study social, political and economic change throughout the chronological period.

A further unit on the 'Twentieth Century World,' acts as a pathway for those students whc wish to study GCSE History, as well as providing students who do not wish to pursue the GCSE Option, with an overview of some of the main events and personalities of the century.

 

GCSE History - A Subject Synopsis

The school follows History Syllabus B by AQA, which concentrates upon the Modern World (British and World Affairs after 1900).

Syllabus Contents

a) Part 1 - International History 1900-1955:

  • The Origins of the First World War.
  • The Treaty of Versailles and the League of Nations.
  • Hitler’s Foreign Policy and the Origins of the Second World War.
  • The Beginnings and Development of the Cold War 1945-1960.

These topics are assessed by an exam paper lasting 1hr. 45mins, which contains a variety of source and factual questions. This is worth 37.5% of the final GCSE mark.

b) Part 2 - 20th Century Depth Studies:

  • Section A: Weimar Germany 1918-1929
  • Section B: Hitler’s Germany 1929-1945
  • Section C: War in Vietnam 1954-1975

In Sections A and B the emphasis falls upon the beginnings and failings of Weimar Germany, before concentrating on life within Hitler’s Third Reich. Section C explores why the United States became entangled in the Vietnam War, how media coverage affected perceptions of the war and why the United States found it so difficult to achieve ‘peace with honour.’

These topics are also assessed by an exam paper lasting 1hr. 45mins, which contains a mixture of source and factual questions. This is worth 37.5% of the final GCSE mark.

c) Part 3 - Historical Enquiry: Britain at War.

Two main questions are investigated in this topic;

  • i) What differences were there in the methods of fighting in the First and Second World Wars?
  • ii) Why were Britain and her allies victorious in the First and Second World Wars?

These two questions are investigated via two controlled assessments, which are to be conducted in the classroom. They have effectively replaced coursework. In total, they are worth 25% of the final GCSE mark.

 

A-Level History - A Subject Synopsis

1)    Introduction:

From September 2015, for pupils the school will follow the revised AS and A2 History syllabus of the AQA examination board.

Pupils will have the option of following the AS or full A-Level course. Both courses have been designed to be taught concurrently.

 

2)    AS History: Intended for students wishing to follow a shortened course over one year.

 a)    Unit 1:   Breadth Study – Industrialisation and the People, Britain c1783-1832.

This unit explores the manner in which Britain was governed. It examines how effectively the governing classes responded to the challenges of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic War, as well as social, political and economic change within the British Isles.

Particular attention is paid within this unit to the government of Lord Liverpool 1812-27, as well as the reasons for Earl Grey’s decision to introduce the Great Reform Act of 1832.

 b)    Unit 2:   Depth Study – Revolution and Dictatorship: Russia and the Soviet Union 1917-1929.

Three themes are assessed within this study unit. The first looks at the causes, events and effects of the Russian Revolutions of 1917. This is built upon through an assessment of how successfully Lenin and the Bolsheviks were able to consolidate their grip on power until Lenin’s death in 1924.

The third area for study looks at Stalin’s rise to power and his consolidation of power, 1924-29.

Both the aforementioned units are assessed via examination papers lasting 1 hour 30 minutes, with each examination paper worth 50% of the overall AS mark.

 

3)    A-Level History: Intended for students wishing to follow an extended course over two years.

a)    Unit 1:   Breadth Study - Industrialisation and the People: Britain 1783-1885.

In addition to the subject content for AS History Unit 1, students also look at Britain in ‘The Age of Reform’ from 1832-1885.

It examines the manner in which the British political system evolved, as well as how successfully the governing classes were able to respond to the internal social, political and economic challenges they faced.

Particular attention is paid to the governments of the dominant political figures of the age, such as Grey, Peel, Gladstone and Disraeli.

 

b)    Unit 2:   Depth Study - Revolution and Dictatorship: Russia 1917-1953.

In addition to the subject content for AS History Unit 2, students also look at ‘Stalin’s Rule, 1929-1953.’

An additional three themes are assessed within this study unit. An initial assessment of the extent of social and economic change within Stalinist Russia, 1929-1941 is studied, in conjunction with a separate unit on the governing of Stalinist Russia in the same period. The former looks at the relative success of collectivization of agriculture, the Five Year Plans for industry and the development of the ‘cult of Stalin.’ The latter looks at the Stalinist Purges and the Soviet Union’s external relations prior to WW2.

A final unit focuses upon the reasons why the Soviet Union emerged victorious in the ‘Great Patriotic War,’ post-war internal affairs and the transformation of the Soviet Union’s external relations in the age of the Cold War.

 

c)    Unit 3:   Historical Investigation:

Students complete an extended study consisting of 3,500 words on a topic which is open to different historical interpretations. The study has to focus upon a specific issue within the context of a hundred years.

Recent studies from students at Lime House School have included;

‘In the context of the period 1349-1451, to what extent did the Peasants Revolt of 1381 pose a threat to the social stability of England?’

‘How did Sir Francis Walsingham contain religious instability in England during the period 1525-1625?’

‘To what extent did Andrew de Moray act as a catalyst in the fight for Scottish Independence 1263-1372?’

                   

Units 1 and 2 are assessed via examination papers lasting 2 hours 30 minutes, which are both worth 40% of the final A-Level award.

Unit 3 is internally marked and externally moderated by AQA. It is worth 20% of the final A-Level award.